Keen to recruit your first tax partner? 8 key questions

By |2010-12-22T12:03:57+00:00December 22nd, 2010|Tax related|

One of the most common questions I'm asked, often by recruiters, is if I know a prospective new tax partner for a smaller or mid-size practice. Sadly I can rarely help directly - especially if, as is usually the case, the firm would like their new recruit to have a following (ie clients and fees).

Articulating specialisms – can you do it?

By |2010-11-29T10:50:49+00:00November 29th, 2010|Accountants, Tax related|

I spent last night in the company of numerous ex colleagues from WJB Chiltern. It Was great seeing do many old friends. What has prompted this post though is a realization I had part way through the evening Almost without exception everyone of my Chiltern Alumni was working in onevof two types of firm.  Either

Do your prospects have an appetite for tax schemes?

By |2010-08-18T11:11:42+01:00August 18th, 2010|Tax related|

Talking with a tax and financial adviser recently he told me that his firm is a heavy promoter of tax schemes. "Not a great fan myself" I said. His reply was almost the complete opposite of what I had expected: "I'm not surprised" he said. "Few people actually go ahead and implement the schemes." "So

Adverblog: Cost effective vetted tax support

By |2010-08-12T10:02:42+01:00August 12th, 2010|Tax related|

I mentioned the Tax Advice Network in a recent post for the first time in ages. Newer readers of this blog who haven't read the mini profile piece (top right), may be unaware of the Network. Established in 2007 the Tax Advice Network is a resource and facility for accountants in practice. There's no charge

In-house Tax Directors seek tax support from non-auditors

By |2010-08-05T10:33:03+01:00August 5th, 2010|Tax related|

It seems that many in-house Tax Directors do not use their auditors for tax work and advice.This is one of the conclusions from Winmark’s third benchmarking survey of in-house Tax Directors. Out of over 100 respondents to the Tax Director Network survey, only one-third use their auditors for corporate tax planning, and only a quarter

Disengagement letters

By |2009-04-27T09:54:13+01:00April 27th, 2009|Professional Negligence, Tax related|

Let's face it, few accountants have detailed procedures in place to ensure they do all they need to do when they lose a client. The simple reason for this is that it doesn't happen often enough to warrant a detailed procedure and even when it does occur there's rarely a problem. The larger firms lose

Do you treat clients like lab rats?

By |2009-04-14T09:42:39+01:00April 14th, 2009|Professional Negligence, Tax related|

Probably the most sensible thing any adviser can do is to recognize their limitations. Most accountants are like GPs. Great at dealing with day to day issues. Every now and then though when you visit the doctor they recommend you see a specialist. Indeed you’d be very worried if the GP suggested you hop up

Does the impending recession provide more or fewer opportunities for accountants?.

By |2008-10-24T12:48:41+01:00October 24th, 2008|No longer current, Tax related|

As the preparation continues for a new seminar I'm presenting next month I started to think about the specific tax advice that might be relevant as the economy moves toward a recession. Let me stress that I'm referring here to the technical definition (two consecutive quarters of negative growth). From a  personal perspective I see

How far do you go?

By |2008-07-21T07:55:13+01:00July 21st, 2008|Professional Negligence, Servicing clients, Tax related|

This was another of the thoughts I had during the workshop that followed an E-business for accountants seminar that I attended. (I've already commented on the seminar here and here). One of the workshop leaders was suggesting that accountants should be more prepared to 'upskill' their clients as regards their e-business strategy. I asked whether he

Tax support for accountants

By |2008-07-02T07:54:07+01:00July 2nd, 2008|Tax related|

I'm often asked what prompted me to create the Tax Advice Network. Having spent three years running the tax support for professionals operation at WJB Chiltern I had become aware of how much accountants both valued the facility to secure expert tax support and yet, at the same time resented the traditional approach: A BIG

Clients will pay high fees for good advice

By |2008-04-10T09:25:15+01:00April 10th, 2008|Tax related|

I have just read a report in Accountancy Magazine about some research published by the UK 200 group*. The report notes that: Clients are more likely to ditch their accountants for giving therm incorrect or poor advice than for being too expensive......Clients only rate high fees as the THIRD most important reason for switching accountants

Trends that will matter in 2008 – for accountants

By |2008-01-07T08:02:31+00:00January 7th, 2008|Tax related|

I noted last week that I was not one for making predictions generally. Instead I simply set out my (accountancy related )hopes for 2008. Since then I've had cause to consider what new trends there may be this year. Here's what I've said: 1 - More clients will be texting communications to their accountants. NB:

Happy new year – be careful what you wish for

By |2008-01-02T09:33:11+00:00January 2nd, 2008|Mark's other sites, Professional Negligence, Speaking, Tax related, Useful links|

I'm not one for making annual new year resolutions - or indeed 'predictions'. Indeed, rather than risk 'predictions' for 2008 I offer instead three of my hopes for the new year, that Accountants will: 1 - earn more money by advising their clients about their menu pricing models - so that clients know they'll pay