Your service is not unique but you are

Years ago I became quite attached to the idea of identifying UPBs (Unique Perceived Benefits). I prefered this approach of looking at the provision of services from the client’s viewpoint rather than trying to identify a USP (Unique Selling Proposition).

More recently though I have realised that it is all but impossible for any of us to provide our services in a ‘unique’ way.  How many professionals offer any element of their service in a way that is like no other? More often I have noted that claims of USPs are all too similar. I believe that most prospective clients dismiss them as simple marketing puff. This may also mean that such claims have a negative impact.

I believe that there are other ways in which we can each distinguish our services so that they STAND OUT in a positive way. This is often a pre-requisite if we want to be remembered, referred and recommended to the type of clients we want, to do the work we enjoy and for which we get paid the fees we deserve. I have touched on such ideas in other blog posts here as well as in my ebook.

In my talk about ‘How to STAND OUT’ I explain that there are two key ways in which you can do this. One is focused around your core business messages, marketing and branding. The other around the quality and power of the conversations that you have.

I am indebted to my friend, Alan Stevens, for reminding me recently that though our services may not be unique, we are all individually unique. Sometimes for good, sometimes for bad. In ‘The MediaCoach‘, his free weekly ezine, Alan noted that:

There are millions of social media postings every day. Many of them repeat the same old stuff, often about how to be a better person or “dos and don’ts” for some endeavour or other. Some of them are very good, but most of them are not. The ones that I read and enjoy most are those that stand out from the crowd by having a unique, personal point of view. I may not always agree with the poster, but I’m always interested to read what they say.

Many posters seem to want to be someone else. They copy styles, ideas, and often even entire posts from experts they admire. Alas, no-one is going to be interested in recycled ideas. They want the real thing. To be a successful poster, I suggest you focus on your uniqueness (and don’t tell me you aren’t unique, because there is obviously no-one else like you).

In short, express your views, even if they are out of line with the mainstream (especially if they are out of line). Try to back up your views with evidence, otherwise they can just become a rant (a statement for which you have no evidence at all). Be controversial. Be yourself. Be unique.

I agree. Do you?

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Linkedin and Facebook. What’s the difference?

A trainee accountant I know had just heard that I’d been speaking about Linkedin at an accountancy firm’s away day. He was amazed that a firm would need this as, in his words, “Linkedin is just like Facebook isn’t it?”

This is a common misconception, fuelled in part by surveys and articles that reference Linkedin simply as just another social networking site. This causes many older people to dismiss Linkedin as they have no interest in social networking. And many younger people then pay it little attention as they are already active on Facebook. “Why bother doing much on a copycat site?”

My view is quite simple. The two sites are very different.

For professionals, like accountants, I suggest viewing Facebook as being principally for fun, friends and family.

Linkedin however is where you can build, manage and utilise your business connections. It’s more of a professional business networking site rather than somewhere to share your social activities and non-business views.

Crucially, as I explained to my young friend, his career moves are more likely to benefit from his Linkedin activity than from his use of facebook. The latter has more potential to have an adverse impact if postings and comments are not carefully considered.

Linkedin can also be used as a powerful career enhancer and I have spoken about this before. More and more recruitment decisions are influenced by Linkedin profiles. Also relevant to your career success will be your activity and the connections you build up on Linkedin.

The other key distinction between facebook and Linkedin is that the latter is a powerful lead generation tool that can be used by accountants – of all ages.  And this tends to be the focus of the talks I present on the subject both in-house and at conferences.  Hence my conclusion that Linkedin is VERY different to Facebook and a far more valuable and important tool for most accountants.

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You need to avoid STANDING OUT for the wrong reasons

This list started as a quick note of ways in which you might STAND OUT to people who meet you, but for the wrong reasons.  In each case I suggest that the issue is one which will probably undermine your credibility even if you are remembered. There is little benefit in being remembered for the wrong reasons as you will not then win the referrals and recommendations you seek.

As I started thinking further about this the list has grown longer. If you can think of anything else please add your comments below. And equally if you disagree with anything below please share your reasons:

  • A limp loose handshake
  • Errors on your business card
  • Amateurish logo design
  • Inability to look people in the eye when talking to them
  • Broken links on your website
  • Talking too much when you meet people
  • Having an info@ style email address
  • Branded vistaprint or moo ‘business’ cards
  • Breaching client confidences
  • Being rude, unpleasant or miserable
  • Looking a mess
  • Claiming to have a USP that is clearly not Unique
  • Excessive non-business related tweets (on twitter)
  • Failing to look people in the eye when listening or talking with them
  • Being dirty or smelly or both
  • Unprofessional looking marketing materials or website
  • Inconsistent claims as to your expertise online
  • Highlighting irrelevant features of your service offering
  • Tiny font on your business card
  • Inability to talk about anything other than accounting and tax
  • Being arrogant (unless you are a litigator when it MAY be a less unattractive quality)
  • Adopting copycat or other tactics that do not appear credible or congruent
  • Lack of clarity as to your ideal new client
  • Appearing to be lethargic and lacking energy and enthusiasm
  • Extensive irrelevant or boring conversation
  • Use of inappropriate language online or face to face
  • Failing to keep your promise as to how and when you will follow up

During my talks on ‘How to STAND OUT’ I explain that my focus is on the perceptions that we create when we meet people for the first time. Most accountants would prefer to encourage a positive perception. There are few people who would form such a view if faced with any of the above. First impressions count so we all want to avoid STANDING OUT for the wrong reasons.

Do you agree, disagree or have suggestions of other things accountants could do that might constitute STANDING OUT but for the wrong reasons?

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