What is it that can go wrong?

By |2009-04-29T09:55:56+00:00April 29th, 2009|Professional Negligence, Speaking|

Over the years I have collected dozens and dozens of stories of what it is that has led to problems for accountants. Such examples help inform my talks about how to avoid negligence claims. It's also worth recognising how easy it is for things to go wrong; after all they do say that forewarned is forearmed.

What do accountants sell? The answer is NOT Time

By |2009-02-09T08:26:52+00:00February 9th, 2009|Accountants, Business messaging and branding, Speaking|

Many, but NOT all accountants, charge fees by reference to the time they spend working on a client's affairs. Most accountants in practice still complete timesheets to show how much of their day has been devoted to each different client and to each different aspect of management, administration, marketing or other 'non-billable' time. Thinking back

How accountants can beat the recession

By |2008-12-12T10:13:21+00:00December 12th, 2008|Accountants, Speaking, Uncategorized|

Some readers of this blog will be aware that I recently created a new seminar for accountants:  Mastering the credit crunch - Your practice, your advice, your future. During what was a highly practical and commercial half day I suggested that the credit crunch (or recession as now seems to be accepted as a more

Giving constructive feedback

By |2008-04-07T08:00:22+00:00April 7th, 2008|Speaking|

I'm serving as an evaluator at my local speakers club, Harrovians, this evening. The club is affiliated to Toastmasters International and encourages evaluators to follow a well established structure when evaluating speeches: Commend, Recommend, Commend. I was about to post an item about this but then checked and realised that last July I posted an

Dealing with difficult clients

By |2008-04-03T11:41:51+00:00April 3rd, 2008|Speaking|

Last week I encouraged you to identify and ditch your duff D-list clients. That's fine if you're in a position of authority in your practice - a sole practitioner or a partner for example. But what if you don't have that level of authority? Then it becomes a question of how can you best deal

Happy new year – be careful what you wish for

By |2008-01-02T09:33:11+00:00January 2nd, 2008|Mark's other sites, Professional Negligence, Speaking, Tax related, Useful links|

I'm not one for making annual new year resolutions - or indeed 'predictions'. Indeed, rather than risk 'predictions' for 2008 I offer instead three of my hopes for the new year, that Accountants will: 1 - earn more money by advising their clients about their menu pricing models - so that clients know they'll pay