Are you quoting myths or facts to support your advice?

,

Was this post helpful?

Be social and share this post...

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedintumblrFacebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedintumblr

Get your free copy of The 7 Key ways to Stand Out from your peers NOW!


The following two tabs change content below.

Mark Lee

Mark is a speaker, mentor, facilitator, author, blogger and debunker. Mark Lee helps professionals who want to STAND OUT and be remembered, referred and recommended using his 7 fundamental principles to create a more powerful professional impact, online and face to face.
by
3 replies
  1. Bernard O'Kelly
    Bernard O'Kelly says:

    Just curious. Do you know what the split between body language, tone of voice and content of words is where (as in your case) you are making a professional presentation to professionals.

    Regards

    Bernard

    Reply
    • Mark Lee
      Mark Lee says:

      Hi Bernard. I’m not sure anyone knows. So far as I’m aware the only validated research was conducted by Professor Meherabian in 1971. I explain more about this and my views on the topic in my original blog post referenced above. In summary, I believe all elements are important, and that their relative importance will vary dependant upon the topic, the presenter and the audience.

      Reply
  2. John Simonett
    John Simonett says:

    Ah the good old Mehrabian Myth! I have heard many versions of it over the years! So if only 7% of communication is down the the words you use that means you could understand 93% of a speech in a foreign language just by observing facial expressions and body language? How could anyone who thinks about it not question it! It’s all to do with communicating feelings and emotions – and his research simply looked at how we tell when someone is saying something that they don’t believe… so in a nutshell “when words and non-verbal messages are in conflict, people believe the non-verbal every time.” To extrapolate from this that 93% of ALL communication is non verbal is plainly… ridiculous! Keep spreading the word, Mark!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *